BarbBarbara H. Peterson

SMCC

Out of a gallon of raw Jersey milk, leaving about a half inch of cream on the top, I got 9 oz of butter, and 12 oz of buttermilk.

At my last store adventure, I priced 16 oz of butter at around $2.60, a gallon of milk at around $3.00, and buttermilk runs around $3.50 per half gallon. I paid $3.00 for a gallon of raw milk and made both butter and buttermilk, and had 3/4 of a gallon of raw milk left. Do the math!!!

Instructions:

Skim the cream off the raw milk after it has risen to the top. Place the cream in a food processor and turn on. Process until the butter separates from the buttermilk. Strain the buttermilk from the butter, and rinse the butter in cold water. Now shape it any way you want, refrigerate and drink the buttermilk before anyone gets to it!

Pics:

Butter separated from buttermilk after running the food processor

making butter

Butter

finished  butter

Buttermilk

buttermilk

Barbara H. Peterson

This oughta give you some ideas regarding those old pallets!

 

After the huge success of the Sling-X-Bow, The Slingshot Channel received many requests for a how-to video tutorial. Making this powerful and accurate weapon without welding and turning gear meant a total redesign of the construction, which took a while. The outcome is spectacular: Entirely out of wood and off-the-shelf screws, everybody with basic tools and skills can follow these instructions.The video contains a shot at sheep shoulderblade bones that are attached to a cat food can. See the bullet smashing through both the bones and the cans!

The blueprints for the board cutouts can be downloaded from here: SlingXBowBlueprintsV2


Source: Garden Guides

Most people consider milk thistle a pesky weed because it can grow tall and thorny, making it hard to even get near. However, it is loaded with medicinal benefits. The U.S. National Cancer Institute reports that milk thistle contains the active ingredient silymarin, which is used to treat liver and gallbladder problems and is an antioxidant that protects the cells against damage. The silymarin from milk thistle is in the seeds, which are used to make extracts or tinctures for medicinal use. If you have milk thistle growing near you, you can harvest your own seeds. You can also cook and eat the leaves and flower heads.

Step 1

Put on heavy gloves and protective clothing.

Step 2

Take your scissors and cut the flower heads when they are young if you wish to eat them. Simply boil or steam them until they are tender.

Step 3

Cut the young leaves from the stalk and steam them as you would spinach. If you simply want to harvest the milk thistle seeds, go on to Step 4.

Step 4

Wait for the seed heads to turn brown.

Step 5

Cut the seed heads off the milk thistle plant and place them in a paper bag. Store it in a cool, dry spot for 48 hours.

Step 6

Lay a window screen on a counter. Take one seed head at a time and carefully brush the seeds out of the head and onto the screen. Remove any debris from the seeds. Place the cleaned seeds in a glass jar or sealed plastic container.

This is my kinda guy!

If you have been reading this blog then you know that I have been searching for a solution to pump water from a deep well that doesn’t require 220 power. Well, here it is. I can hook the air compressor that runs this system into a small solar generator and have all the water I need or want sans the power company. Thank you Mike Adams, the Health Ranger at naturalnews.com