My Kitchen Pot

Homemade Lavender Laundry Detergent

Ingredients:

4 – 4oz bars of grated Castile soap
1- 78oz. box of Borax
8 lbs of baking soda
3 tablespoons lavender, lemon or grapefruit essential oil (I use lavender and I put a little extra in)

Grate the soap, I tried a grater that sucks. Save yourself time and man power and use your food processor! Combine all ingredients except essential oil. Stir several times with your hands or a wooden spoon to mix all ingredients together. Add essential oil, mix, add essential oil, mix. Do that several times until it smells nice. One batch will cover 288 loads if you are using 2 T per load.

http://mykitchenpot.com/homemade-lavender-laundry-detergent/

Barbara H. Peterson

SMCC

Seasonings can be spendy, and full of things that we don’t really want to put into our bodies. So, how can you make sure that you get 100% organic, healthy seasonings? One way is to grow and prepare them yourself. Here is a simple way to make onion powder using Egyptian Walking Onions. They are extremely easy to keep, as they come back every year by themselves, and the harvest is bountiful.

Here is where it starts, at the onion bed. These onions will develop a cluster of small bulbs that can be harvested and eaten – delicious!

Step 1

Harvest the tops of your Walking Onions by simply grabbing the top cluster of bulbs and popping them off. Rinse, and let dry. (more…)

Barbara H. Peterson

SMCC

Cleaning is a chore normally accomplished with rubber gloves, barriers to keep animals away, locked cupboards to keep children from getting poisoned, and warning labels to indicate that contact with such poisonous substances is dangerous.

Quite frankly, I’m sick of it. I am tired of hoping that I cleaned off the poison used to clean my counters well enough that the piece of fruit that I just placed on that counter is safe from contamination. So, I tried the following recipe, and it works. In fact it works so well that I had to share it. The critters, kids and adults are safe, and it costs pennies to make.

Recipe

1. Take a large glass jar and pack full with orange peels.

2. Pour real apple cider vinegar into jar to the top, wait for it to settle, then top off.

3. Place lid on jar and let sit for 10 days.

4. After 10 days, strain liquid from jar and pour it into a spray bottle.

5. Clean without worries!

Source: Life on the Balcony

Find a Pallet

The first thing you need to do is–obviously–find a pallet. I’ve had good luck finding them in dumpsters behind supermarkets. No need to be squeamish. It doesn’t smell. At least, it doesn’t smell that bad. Don’t just take the first pallet you find. You’re looking for one with all the boards in good condition, no nails sticking out, no rotting, etc. If you intend to put edibles in your pallet, be sure to find one that was heat treated as opposed to fumigated with pesticides. READ MORE

Tony’s Trailers

Building your own free utility trailer:

Yes it’s true you can and I will show you some pictures that will get you started looking for the free material to build your own cargo trailer. All the materials can be had for free; this includes a derelict shopping cart and old bicycles and parts. Of course you supply the labor and tools and equipment to do the work.

Here is the YouTube link to see the rest of the instructions:

http://www.youtube.com/user/tonyhoar1#g/u

Graphic: Mother Earth News

By Paul D. Matteoni
January/February 1972
Source: Mother Earth News

Soap making in the woods can be an almost automatic thing, with hickory, sugar maple, ash, beech and buckeye as the best producers of lye plus a bucket of rain water and some left-over cooking fat – you can easily brew up enough soap to clean everybody and everything that need it.

If it hadn’t been for the help we got from the native old-timers . . . my friend, Dennis, and I would have starved or just plain quit the winter we settled into that abandoned miner’s cabin in Alaska. The sourdoughs came to our rescue, though, and soon taught us how to survive on less than $10 a month cash money by trapping, tanning, foraging food and dipping candles from our own tallow and lard. With their generous assistance, we also quickly mastered the fine and easy art of recycling hardwood ashes and left-over kitchen fats into clean, all purpose soap.

(more…)