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By David Gutierrez, staff writer

Natural News

(NaturalNews) Drug and chemical giant Bayer AG has admitted that there is no way to stop the uncontrolled spread of its genetically modified crops.

“Even the best practices can’t guarantee perfection,” said Mark Ferguson, the company’s defense lawyer in a recent trial.

Two Missouri farmers sued Bayer for contaminating their crop with modified genes from an experimental strain of rice engineered to be resistant to the company’s Liberty-brand herbicide. The contamination occurred in 2006, during an open field test of the new rice, which was not approved for human consumption. According to the plaintiffs’ lawyer, Don Downing, genetic material from the unapproved rice contaminated more than 30 percent of all rice cropland in the United States. READ MORE…

(C) 2010 B.H. Peterson Farmwars.info

Source: Non-GMO Project

An Organic Amicus brief has been filed in support of the Center for Food Safety’s case against Monsanto’s Supreme Court appeal of the lower court-ordered injunction against the selling of GM alfalfa. Monsanto seeks to overturn the lower court ruling that prohibits the company from selling its seed, due to the court’s concerns about the adverse effects of widespread GMO contamination. The judge in that case has required USDA to “take a hard look” at the contamination issue before granting the deregulation of GM alfalfa. This “hard look” is intended to be contained in the final environmental impact statement (EIS) that USDA released for public comment in December of 2009. USDA is now in the process of reviewing and preparing its response to public comments as a basis for issuing a final EIS and for deciding whether and/or under what conditions it will deregulation GM alfalfa.

Click here to read the Organic Amicus brief.