Raw Foods


BarbBarbara H. Peterson

SMCC

Out of a gallon of raw Jersey milk, leaving about a half inch of cream on the top, I got 9 oz of butter, and 12 oz of buttermilk.

At my last store adventure, I priced 16 oz of butter at around $2.60, a gallon of milk at around $3.00, and buttermilk runs around $3.50 per half gallon. I paid $3.00 for a gallon of raw milk and made both butter and buttermilk, and had 3/4 of a gallon of raw milk left. Do the math!!!

Instructions:

Skim the cream off the raw milk after it has risen to the top. Place the cream in a food processor and turn on. Process until the butter separates from the buttermilk. Strain the buttermilk from the butter, and rinse the butter in cold water. Now shape it any way you want, refrigerate and drink the buttermilk before anyone gets to it!

Pics:

Butter separated from buttermilk after running the food processor

making butter

Butter

finished  butter

Buttermilk

buttermilk

Barbara H. Peterson

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By Barbara H. Peterson

In 2005, I experienced something that rocked my world. It started with an itch about halfway between my right knee and ankle, on the side of my leg. I inspected the area, and saw a couple of small bumps that looked like pimples. By the next day, the affected area had grown from just these few bumps to a dime-sized area filled with them. The itching increased. I sloughed it off to some sort of allergic reaction that would go away shortly. It didn’t. In fact, it grew to the point of keeping me awake at night.

When scratched, the bumps oozed clear liquid. I can best describe what this turned into as the worst case of poison oak rash that anyone has ever endured. This rash spread all the way up my leg to my shoulders, and included the other leg as well. There seemed to be no relief in sight. I got so desperate to ease the itching that I actually bathed in bleach. This DID NOT help. In fact, it only made things worse. Antibiotics did not work, fungicides did not work, steroid creams did not work. NOTHING worked. I was desperate.

I finally determined that the food I was eating must have something to do with it and stopped eating, drinking my pure well water only. The itching seemed to subside. Quite frankly, after making this connection, I was scared to eat! This couldn’t go on for long, so after hunger took over, I slowly started introducing foods into my diet, one item at a time.

It should be noted that during this time, I was told about genetically modified foods (GMOs) and started doing some research. I checked out the labels of all of the processed foods in my kitchen, and found that almost all of them contained known GM ingredients such as corn, soy, beet sugar, and milk containing rBGH hormone. Could this be the cause of my affliction? I would soon find out.  (more…)

GroEdibles Blog

Here are some reliable links from university cooperative extensions and other sources around the country.

As the plants will vary regionally it is important to seek out information pertaining to your specific region. REMEMBER: some plants are toxic at various levels of ingestion…single ingestion or cumulative. Always use caution when identifying and using wild plants and, of course, NEVER eat any plant that may have been sprayed with pesticide.

“The prime directive in foraging for wild plants for consumption is simple, yet its violation has led to illness and even fatalities. You must never consume any part of any plant whose identity is questionable. There are a number of plants whose look-alikes are toxic and whose identity must carefully be ascertained before they are used. Certain parts of some edible plants may be poisonous. Some plants are edible when young but become toxic later on. Some plants are edible during certain seasons but toxic during others. ” Familiarizing Students with some Edible & Poisonous Wild Plants, Barry s. Kendler, Dominick J. Pirone, Manhattan College, Bronx, NY, · The American Biology Teacher Vol. 51, No. 8 (Nov. – Dec., 1989), pp. 463-471 Published by: University of California Press.

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